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THE COMPLETE RECOVERY ROOM BOOK

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The care that a patient receives in the first hours after surgery is crucial to minimizing the risk of complications such as heart attacks, pneumonia, and blood clots. download The Complete Recovery Room Book 5 by Anthea Hatfield (ISBN: ) from site's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on. The Complete Recovery Room Book by Anthea Hatfield, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.


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'Essential download' on Doody's Core Titles List The Complete Recovery Room Book. Fifth Edition. Anthea Hatfield. The definitive guide. The Complete Recovery Room Book: Medicine & Health Science Books @ musicmarkup.info The recovery room staff must manage both comatose and physiologically unstable patients, and deal with the immediate post-operative care of surgical patients.

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New Releases. Linguistics Anaesthetics Surgery Peri-operative Care. The Complete Recovery Room Book. Description The care that a patient receives in the first hours after surgery is crucial to minimizing the risk of complications such as heart attacks, pneumonia, and blood clots.

Complete room the book recovery

As the patient awakes from their drug-induced coma, it takes time for them to metabolize and excrete these drugs, during which period they remain unable to care for themselves, and at increased risk of harm. The body undergoes extreme physiological assault from pain, hypothermia, hypoxia, acid-base disturbance and shifts in blood volume. The recovery room staff must manage these symptoms in both comatose and physiologically unstable patients, and deal with the immediate post-operative care of surgical patients by attending to drips, drains and dressings.

It is an environment where many skills and equipment are brought together, and successful development of these units has significantly reduced the number of deaths from preventable conditions.

In helping the patient from the high pressure operating theatre to the wards, nurses, surgeons and anaesthetists will be required to manage day-to-day problems, but also make difficult decisions.

Previous editions of this book have established it as the definitive guide to setting-up, equipping, staffing, and administering this acute care unit. It includes basic science such as physiology and pharmacology, specific symptoms including pain and vomiting, and has chapters devoted to the unique post-operative needs of individual types of surgery. This new edition brings this important text up to date, including new material on risk management, administration and quality control; expanded sections on anaesthetic practice and infection prevention; and incorporating the recent developments in pain control, nausea and vomiting, care of children, pregnancy, and care of the cardiac patient.

Product details Format Paperback pages Dimensions He was previously a Senior Lecturer at Monash University, with over 20 years' experience in medical and paramedical training. Review quote The fact that Hatfield and Tronson's book is in its fourth edition is an indication of its success.

Essential reading for healthcare professionals involved in post-operative care Nursing Standard This book covers all aspects of recovery room management and explains the relevant physiology and pharmacology for the better understanding of specific problems. The style and language is easy and consistent, as all the chapters are written by two experienced authors. British Journals of Anaesthesia An uncomplicated read without over-simplification.

This is no mean feat There is undoubtedly lots of good information in this book and it should provide a useful reference text in the recovery room. It is written by an anaesthetist, based in New Zealand, rather than a recovery room nurse.

ISBN 13: 9780199666041

In the preface, it is not stated who is the target audience for this book, but I assume it is recovery room nurses. I felt the book seemed rather dated in style and content. Specifically, there was no discussion of management of a ventilated patient, while they await stabilization of their condition or admission to an intensive care unit ICU.

Certainly, in the UK, this is a common practice in recovery units due to either inadequate provision of staffed ICU beds or the extended use of recovery units for postoperative care of patients e.

Complete Recovery Room Book - Oxford Medicine

There is very limited discussion of extended roles for recovery staff, for example, inserting nasogastric tubes, venous cannulation, removal of tracheal tubes, central venous catheters or chest drains, and the use of newer monitors of cardiac output.

The book is written in a very didactic fashion, which works well in some areas, but I found irritating in others, particularly where one knows that the recommendation is not evidence based or clearcut. Jargon is widely used in some sections, which I disliked, and suggests perhaps that nurses might not understand more complex text have you heard of a zoo of cytokines, boutique blood?

Some recent international up-to-date warnings are missing, for example, rapid administration of ondansetron with the risk of arrhythmias in patients with long QT. Some sections are probably at least partially incorrect including the section quotes below related to: Core hyperthermia. Morbidly obese people may meltdown after surgery or trauma. Core hyperthermia occurs rarely, but can be lethal.

Core hyperthermia occurs because obese patients have a thick layer of insulating fat surrounding them. Pain, hypovolemia, or sepsis causes the circulation to the skin to shut down so heat can no longer escape. After few hours this bottled up heat raises their core temperature to lethal levels. Although cooking on the inside with a core temperature greater than 41C the patients skin is cold and clammy. They are in mortal danger… While thermoregulation will be altered by morbid obesity, I could not find this particular pattern emphasized elsewhere in the medical literature, and have not been aware of it as a particular problem in my anaesthetic or critical care practice looking after morbidly obese patients.

The Complete Recovery Room Book. Anthea Hatfield. The care that a patient receives in the first hours after surgery is crucial to minimizing the risk of complications such as heart attacks, pneumonia, and blood clots. As the patient awakes from their drug-induced coma, it takes time for them to metabolize and excrete these drugs, during which period they remain unable to care for themselves, and at increased risk of harm.

The recovery room staff must manage both comatose and physiologically unstable patients, and deal with the immediate post-operative care of surgical patients. The fifth edition of this popular book provides nurses, surgeons and anaesthetists with clear guidance on how to manage day-to-day problems and how to make difficult decisions.

The Complete Recovery Room Book

Previous editions of this book have established it as the definitive guide to setting-up, equipping, staffing, and administering an acute care unit. It includes basic science such as physiology and pharmacology, specific symptoms including pain and vomiting, and has chapters devoted to the unique post-operative needs of individual types of surgery. This new edition brings this important text up to date and new drugs and techniques for monitoring are described.

A new section looks ahead to the future development and design of recovery rooms and how they can contribute to patient well being.

Complete book room the recovery

Chapter 2 Recovery room procedures. Chapter 3 Design of the recovery room. Chapter 4 Monitoring and equipment. Chapter 6 Postoperative pain.

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