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HOODOO CONJURATION WITCHCRAFT ROOTWORK DOWNLOAD

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Downloaded: times | Size: 13 pages | Add to wishlist | Download for @5 credits. . [ recommended ] Hoodoo Conjuration Witchcraft & Rootwork Vol 1 . Downloaded: 68 times | Size: pages | Add to wishlist | Download for @ credits . [ recommended ] Hoodoo Conjuration Witchcraft & Rootwork Vol 5. Hoodoo--conjuration--witchcraft--rootwork;: Beliefs accepted by many Negroes and white Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.


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Hoodoo - Conjuration - Witchcraft - Rootwork (HCWR) is a 5-volume, page collection of folkloric material gathered by Hyatt in Alabama. MEMOIRS OF THE ALMA EGAN HYATT FOUNDATION HOODOO- CONJURATION- WITCHCRAFT-ROOTWORK IN TWO VOLUMES HARRY MIDDLETON. Hoodoo-conjuration-witchcraft-rootwork by Harry Middleton Hyatt; 7 editions; First published in ; Subjects: African Americans.

May 20, Andy rated it it was amazing Feel free the skip the nostalgia and go straight to the review below As a kid I had a fascination with folklore, superstitions and ghost tales. To some extent it's still true, but I was a kid when I first heard of Hyatt's work. In the bibliography of that book Schwartz noted Feel free the skip the nostalgia and go straight to the review below In the bibliography of that book Schwartz noted that the , 2nd Edition of Hyatt's book has "16, entries, the largest single compilation of folk beliefs relating to the United States.

These books are collections of transcribed interviews and oral accounts from 1, informants Hyatt interviewed across the American South in the 's.

Hoodoo Conjuration WItchcraft & Rootwork

The first two volumes were published together in the 's, the last three were published later. The first volume is the most approachable. It goes through a series of beliefs in a more succinct fashion whereas the latter volumes are primarily long-form interviews.

Volume two is primarily a series of rather meandering interviews, but they're fascinating to read and full of stories of witchcraft and spells. Volume three has more interviews for about half of it's length, then covers topics such as sexual impotence, and spells using blood, urine, excrement, sweat, etc. Volume four covers spells using hair, fingernails and folk medicine.

It also covers how to help a murderer escape, or how trap one.

Hoodoo, Conjuration, Witchcraft, and Rootwork by Harry Middleton Hyatt

It has a large section on graveyard spells and even using hoodoo to win court cases. The final volume is a bit of a miscellaneous, covering spells using salt, nails, pins, frogs and various other things. It ends with a series of interviews Hyatt conducted in Florida in Here's a sample of what you can expect from the interviews. From Volume 2, page They're discussing whether witches and the belief that witches can "ride" a person in their sleep: A: Well, did [do] you believe in there [is] sich a thing as a witch?

Q: Well, I don't know. A: Well, there is sich a thing as a witch. Q: There're the things that ride you, aren't they?

Hoodoo, Conjuration, Witchcraft, and Rootwork

A: Yes sir. Supplementary interviews were conducted in Florida in The Hyatt collection consists of 13, separate magic spells and folkloric beliefs, plus lengthy interviews with professional root doctors, conjures, and hoodoos.

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All but one of Hyatt's informants were African Americans, but several narrations by European-Americans collected for his earlier book, "Folklore From Adams County, Illinois" were also included. Hyatt recorded the material on Edison cylinders and a device called a Telediphone, often without the full knowledge of the participants. He then transcribed and annotated it for publication. The contents are about as follows: Volume One: spells and mojo hands grouped somewhat alphabetically according to their major ingredient e.

Hyatt, who was a white man from the North, transcribed the speech of his informants semi-phonetically. What may look to modern eyes like "racial stereotyping" or making fun of Southerners was actually his sincere attempt to catalogue variant regional pronunciations. I downloaded a few months ago onto my Google Drive and it doesn't have any viruses.

"Hoodoo-Conjuration-Witchcraft-Rootwork" by Harry Hyatt

But FACI is not only important because it served as Hyatt's introduction to hoodoo -- it is also the most thorough and factual record of Irish, English, German, and other white European magical beliefs in America ever assembled, and, as such, it deserves a place on the shelf of any American Neo-Pagan, Wiccan, Fam-Trad or Pow Wow Magic practitioner. Supplementary interviews were conducted in Florida in The "Hoodoo" collection consists of 13, separate magic spells and folkloric beliefs, plus lengthy interviews with professional root doctors, conjures, and hoodoos.

All but one of Hyatt's informants were African-Americans, but several narrations by European-Americans collected for his earlier book, "Folklore From Adams County, Illinois" were also included. Hyatt recorded the material on Edison cylinders and a device called a Telediphone, often without the full knowledge of the participants. He then transcribed and annotated it for publication.

Conjuration download hoodoo witchcraft rootwork

Occasionally his equipment failed or was not available and he took hand-written notes instead. The s field recordings have since been destroyed, with the exception of a few cylinders that Hyatt had pressed onto 78 rpm records.

The Florida interviews of , recorded on cassette tapes, have survived. As if to overcome the ham-fisted linguistic editing of Negro dialect that marred "Folklore From Adams County Illinois," this time Hyatt transcribed the speech of his informants semi-phonetically.

What may look to modern eyes like "racial stereotyping" or making fun of Southerners was actually his sincere attempt to catalogue variant regional pronunciations.

If you read several spells, you will see that he did NOT impose upon his informants one single stereotyped "black dialect" or "Southern dialect" but in fact conveyed, as accurately as he could, the true sound of each person's speech. Reading the spells aloud and noting the location where each informant lived will help you comprehend this.