musicmarkup.info Magazines GAMES FOR VOCABULARY PRACTICE PDF

GAMES FOR VOCABULARY PRACTICE PDF

Monday, November 18, 2019 admin Comments(0)

Games for Grammar Practice is a carefully designed selection of over forty games and students. Always check the boards, cards, or grids for vocabulary items. Engaging, & Fun. Vocabulary. Activities &. Games. For any set of Words. And students of all ages . practice with using context clues. It's used to introduce new. Vocabulary. Practice. Felicity O'Dell and Katie Head. Games for 3 Tell students that each vocabulary item goes with one of the six verbs.


Author:KAREY DELAHANTY
Language:English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country:Sierra Leone
Genre:Biography
Pages:690
Published (Last):26.10.2015
ISBN:515-8-61191-811-2
ePub File Size:15.53 MB
PDF File Size:11.83 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:35690
Uploaded by: MARGERET

Page 1 of Vocabulary Games and. Activities. CEFR Levels B1/B2. Word games grouped by topic to help build student vocabulary. For further help with. Games for Grammar Practice is a teacher's resource book containing a Games for Vocabulary Practice: Interactive Vocabulary Activities for all Levels ( Cambridge Copy Collection) musicmarkup.info Games for Vocabulary Practice - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. Games for vocabulary practice.

Games for Vocabulary Practice is a teacher's resource book containing a selection of more than fifty games and activities for classroom use. Introduction Map Unit l The family Unit 6 Travel and tourism Unit 7 Food and drink 46 "'.. Introduction What roles can games play in vocabulary learning?

If a claim is successful, the student who was challenged has to give away one point to the other student. Only one challenge may be made on each turn. Variation Students take it in turns to play, but instead of throwi ng the dice, the person to the right of the player may say which item from the sheet they would li ke the player to talk about Follow-up Ask students to write their name on the top of their sheet Coil ed the sheets and redistribute them to the class.

Ask a student to read out four different pieces of information about the person they have, without saying who they are describing. The other students have to guess who the person is. Homework A Write 1 00 words comparing yourself with one of the other people from your group.

What do you have in common and how do you differ? B Ask someone outside your class what their answers to the sheet would be in your own language, if necessary and then write a short profile of the person. How special am I? I can't stand people who are selfish with their possessions. Tell thern to choose five from the list and complete the sentences in any way they wish.

Monitor as necessary. Main activity 1 Explain that students are going to play a dating game in which the main contestant asks three other contestants personal questions in order to find a date.

Practice pdf for vocabulary games

The audience then votes on whi ch of the three contestants would be the best date for the main contestant. If it is 1nappropriate or not possible to make this a real dating scenario with people ofthe opposite sex, you can say instead that students are lookmg for a suitable person to go on holiday with, or to share a house with, or to go into business with, etc. I can't stand people who ore selfish with their possessions. What is your most precious possession and how could I persuade you to lend it to me?

I have a tendency to forget people's birthdays. When is your birthday and how would you help me remember it? Monitor and help students as necessary. The rest of the class will be the audience. They should decide how old they are, what sort of job they do, and, for Student A, what their hobbies are and what sort of partner they are looking for. Repeat the process for the other two questions. Then the audience votes to decide which of the three contestants wins the date.

The winning pair choose a prize envelope and read out what they have won. FoUow-up The garne can be repeated with different contestants as often as time allows. After the game has been played once, you can ask a student to take on the role of the host. Homework A Complete the other five sentences from the sheet and give reasons for your answers. B Write a personal advertisement describing yourself and saying why you are the perfect partner for the man or woman of your dreams.

Then give each student a copy of the sheet and tell them that the diamonds are male relatives and the ovals are female relatives. Tell them to lind some of the relatives on the fami ly tree by asking them some questions, e.

Where is Steve's aunt? Monitor as necessary and then check answers with the class Finall y, ask students what relation Steve is to his wife, i. Elicit ni ne male names and nine female names, and write them on the board. Tell Student B to write a woman's name from the board in each oval space on their tree.

They should not look at each other's tree. What's the nome of What is Student A asks Student B about the women in Steve's famil y, e. Whots the nome of Steve's motherl What's Steve's niece colled. Students write the repli es in the correct spaces on their tree. Variation To make the game longer, each student can write in all t he names from the board on their family tree so that they have to ask each other about every rel ative. For this variation students will need a second copy of the t ree to write their answers on.

Follow-up In pairs students use thei r completed famil y trees to practi se making sentences about the relationships between other members of Steve's fami ly, e. Margaret is Jeff's mother-in-law. Homework A Draw your own fami ly tree. Choose six people from it and write a sentence about each one. B If you have access to the Internet, use it to find out about a famous fami ly.

Write six sentences about them. Marriage break-up may not be an acceptable topic in some countries. The pictures on the photocopiable sheet are intended to allow for a vari ety of stories to emerge, and teachers may also choose to exclude certain pictures and vocabulary items if they seem inappropriate. Warm-up 1 Select from the Key vocabulary the items you want to use and write them on the board in random order. Ask students to guess what the topic is. You may find that students do not all agree about the order depending on their culture and upbringing.

Possible order: Main activity 1 Div1de the students into pairs. If possible each pair should have one male and one femal e student, but the activity can still work with other pairings. Give each pair a set of pictures and questions. They should give the characters in the pictures names and decide how old they are, what kind of work they do and how they spend their free time. Students should use the questions as prompts.

Explain to students that they should now each take on the role of one of the characters in their stories. Each pair is then interviewed by the other pair about their marriage. After the interviews, pairs decide on the future of the marriage, whether it is likely to be happy, etc.

Variation Bring in magazine pictures of two men and two women that all the class wi ll be abl e to see. Ask the students to choose one of the men and one of the women to be the coupl e in their story and tell them to give each character a name, a job, etc. Follow-up Go round the class to check how many of the imaginary marriages have been successful or not, and why.

Ask students to nominate the best stories they have heard during the activity. Homework A Write the story you invented from the point of vi ew of either the husband or wife, making sure that you include at least eight of the key vocabulary expressions dealt with in class.

Begin with how they met or will what they first said or will say to one anot her, etc. What did they like about each other? What was the first thing they said to each other? Where did they go on their first date? How often did they meet after that? How soon did they fall in love? What did their parents think about the relationship? When did they decide to settle down? How did he propose to her? How long were they engaged before the wedding?

What was the wedding ceremony like? Where did they go for their honeymoon? How did their lives change after they got married? Ask students to find the other half of that idiom and try to elicit the meaning. Then check answers with the whole c! Main activity 1 Put each pair of students with another pair to make a group of four. Students combi ne their sets of cards. Talk through the rules with the class and check that they understand them.

If a group finishes quickly, tell them to shuffle the ca rds and play the game again. Mon1tor and help as necessary. Variation Oiv1de students into groups of four and give each group a set of cards.

Students spread the cards face down on the table. Students then take it in turns to turn over two cards, making sure the rest of the group can see them. If the student thinks the cards make a pair, they can keep them, if not, they turn the cards face down again. The winner is the person who has collected the most correct pairs when all the cards have been taken. FoUow-up Students stay in their groups and talk about people or situations in thei r own fami ly that could be described using these idioms.

Homework A Choose one of the idioms as the title for a story. Prepare to tell your story to the class. Your classmates will try to guess which idiom you chose as your title. B Write sentences using each of the idioms from the activity.

Don't show them to the other players. The aim of the game is to arrange the cards in your hand to make three complete idioms. Turn over one of the cards on the table, trying not to let the other players see it. You can either pick this card up and keep it, if you think it completes an idiom, or turn it face down again on the table. If you decide to keep the card, you must put one of your other cards face down on the table. You must only have six cards in your hand at any time.

Give each group an envelope of cards. Tell one student in the group to take all the pictures of a boy, one those of a girl, another those of a woman and the last student those of a man. Each student should have five cards. The boy is cleaning his teeth Monitor and help as necessary. The other students write down any new verbs.

Check any difficult vocabulary with the whole class Collect the envelopes of cards. Main activity 1 Divide students into pairs. Ask them to si t back to back with a table or flat surface in front of each of them. Give each student an envelope of cards. Student A takes nine pictures out of the envelope and arranges them in three rows of three, like the grid on t he board. What is C I doing? Student A looks at what card they have in that positi on and replies, e.

The boy is cleaning his teeth. Student B then takes that card from their envelope and places it in front of them in the correct position. Student A checks thei r partner's answers. Then Student 8 arranges nine pictures in a different order for Student A to work out Variation If your class is already famili ar with of place, students may play the same game in pairs, but without using a grid.

The student who has arranged the nine cards then describes the arrangement to their partner, e. The boy cleaning his teeth is next to the girl listening to a CD. Their partner may ask questi ons to check the arrangement, e. Is the boy who ts cleaning hts teeth to the left of the girl whots FoUow- up 1 Divide students into different pairs and make sure that each pair has an envelope of cards.

Student A takes nine cards from the envelope and arranges them in three rows of three, like the grid on the board. Student B should not watch while Student A does this. Student B then turns away and describes which pictures are in which positions. C3 - The man is running.

Student B then selects and places cards for Student A to remember. Homework A Write down the verbs describing the pictures on the sheet under one of these headings, e.

Things I do every day Things I sometimes do Things I never do clean my teeth read a newspaper play football B Write 50 words about what you did yesterday, using as many as possible of the verbs ill ustrated on the sheet. Monitor and help as necessary. Remind students that they can write negative as well as positive sentences, e. I didn't write on email this morning.

Possible answers are suggested in the Key vocabulary section, but you or your students may well have many other interesting ways of completi ng the statements. Main activity You need a large clear area with no tables for this activity. If this is not possible, use the Variation.

With very large classes, you may prefer to split the students into two or three groups. There should be one chair in the orde less than the number of students. The remaining student stands in the centre. Change places with someone if you ate cornflakes for breakfast today. While all those students who ate cornflakes for breakfast are changing places, the student in the middle tries to find a seat in the circl e. The student who is left without a seat in the circl e then stands in the middle and reads one of their sentences.

Write up the prompt Change places if you Variation If it is not possible or appropriate to play such an active game with your students, a game can be played using the same sheet but with all the students sitting down.

Stress that this game depends on players being totally honest. Students take turns to choose a statement from the sheet and complete it in any way they wish.

However, they should begin their statements: Give yourself a point if you After every student has had the chance to make two statements, all players total up their points to see who is the winner. Follow-up Ask students which were the most common activities and which were the most unusual activities. Homework A Write a diary entry in Engl ish about all the things you did yesterday. B Write a letter to a pen friend describing a typical day in your life.

UNIT 3 Daily activities 3. Put the Adverb cards in one envelope and the Phrasal verb cards in another envelope. Ask students to tell you when they last did each of the phrasal verbs on the sheet, e. Check that students understand all the adverbs.

Main activity 1 Divide the students into teams of four to six peopl e. Give each team two envelopes: Tell students not to return the cards to the envelopes after use. This student then acts out the phrasal verb in the manner of the adverb for their team to guess what cards they picked. Students should use mime, not words. The other students may refer to their sheets if necessary.

Variation Th1s activity can be made more challenging by making adverb cards with less frequent adverbs or any adverbs you have been deali ng with recently.

You may also increase the challenge by introducing some different phrasal verb expressions for students to act out Follow.. Homework A Divide the adverbs from the sheet into three groups: B Choose eight of the phrasal verb expressions and write a sentence saying how you usually do each of these things.

You may use an adverb from the sheet or a different one if you prefer, e. I usually tidy up a room reluctantly. Put each set in an envelope labelled Team A. Team B, etc. For the Follow-up and Homeworks A and B. Do this as rapidly as possible with all the pictures, repeating any that the students are not sure of. Main activity 1 Students return their envelope of cards and you place these on a table in front of you.

If a student is unsure of the word, they can whisper it to you to check. The students who are miming are not al lowed to use any words.

When the team has guessed the word correctly, the next student in turn goes to pi ck a card to mime. Variation For a qui cker game, the teams pick cards from just one envelope and the game is fi ni shed when all the cards have been used. Follow-up 1 Divide students into pairs and give each student a copy of the sheet, not cut up.

Monitor as necessary and then check answers with the whole class. Homework A A sk studen ts to wnte d own the it ems f. Things ruse everyday and Thr"ngs I could l1ve Wlthouc B Write 1 2 of the words from the sheet in a phrase with an appropriate verb or adjective, e.

For pdf practice games vocabulary

Try to use a different verb or adjective each time. Kitchen e. What can they see around them? As they do this, elicit as much vocabulary relating to furniture and other household items as possible and try to cover all the main rooms of a house. Main activity 1 Divide students into groups of five. If there are not enough students in your class for groups of this size, the activity can be done in smaller groups where students take responsibility for more than one room.

Make sure that that each student also has a pen and paper. You may also want to demonstrate the game. Explain that if there is any disagreement, the teacher' s decision on what is appropriate is final. Stop the activity after 15 to 20 minutes. Variation The game can be made more challenging by introducing a memory element When students throw the dice and get a room, they have to name all the items that have previously been used for that room and then have to add their own item.

FoUow-up 1 Students work in groups according to the room they were responsible for, e. Groups then calculate which of the original groups got the best 'bathroom' score, best 'kitchen' score, etc. Homework A Find a picture of a room from a magazine. Write a description of that room and comment on why you like or do not like it. B Write words describing your ideal fiat and its contents. Fully furnished Cf. J 1 kitchen jj 5 bathroom Rules of the game - Fully furnished 2 dining room 3 sitting room 4 bedroom , Take turns to throw the dice and then name something according to the number you throw.

As things are named for that room, that player should make a note of them. If there are not enough students in your class for groups of this size, the activity can be done in small er groups where students take responsibi lity for more than one room. Explain that if there is any di sagreement, the teacher's decision on what is appropriate is final. Variation The game can be made more challenging by introducing a memory element.

When students throw the dice and get a room, they have to name all the items that have previously been used for that room and then have to add their own item. Follow-up 1 Students work in groups according to the room they were responsible for, e. Groups then calculate which of the original groups got the best 'bathroom' score, best ' kitchen' score, etc. B Write 1 50 words describing your ideal flat and its contents.

For Warm-up. TV and video, watercolours. Ask them to close their eyes and think for about a minute what this room might be li ke. Tell them not to put their names on their sheets. Main activity 1 Explain that each student is going to ask questions to try to find someone with whom they have at least five things in common. Why is it important for you to hove a cosy room?

Whose photos would you hove in your room? Then ask students to move around the classroom with their sheets asking each other about the rooms they have designed. Give each pair a new copy of the sheet which they now have to complete as a pair.

Ask them to decide what to do about the things t hat they did not originally have in common. Variation If you have a large class, you may prefer to put students into groups of s1x to eight, instead of asking students to move around the classroom. In these groups they ask each other questions to find a partner who has the most similar room to them. Follow-up 1 Collect the individually completed sheets. Make sure that students have not written their names on them. Check that these do not include either of their own sheets.

Tell students to try to identify whose sheets they have. After each pair has made their guess, the students who they think completed those sheets tell the class whether or not the guess was correct. At the end of the class, students whose sheets have not been identified shoul d say which the1r sheets were. Homework A Write - words compari ng your dream room to your actual room. B Write - words about the most important things that you would want to have in your room, explaining why you would want them.

Dream rooms Gfl My dream room Adjectives describing your ideal room Tick 2 adjectives from the list. Then write 2 other adjectives of your own.

D airy D tidy B spacious B bri ght D sunny D ai r-condi tioned D cosy D luxurious functional shady B relaxing B warm quiet original Things you'd have on your walls 2 Tick two things for the walls and then write more about them, e. Circle one in each pair. Tick a maximum of two. D fitted carpet D rug s D polished wood D linoleum D ti les 5 What colour would you wont for the walls? Tick one and then odd more details. A - would love this or 8 - don't feel strongly about this or C - don't wont this Then odd two other things you'd like.

D state-of-the-art music system D well-stocked bookshelves D roomy wardrobe D ki ng-size bed D full-length mirror D UNIT 5 In the town, in the city 5. Elementary ,,. Ask students to explain where a particular place is in their town, e.

Main activity 1 Divide students into pairs, Student A and Student B, and ask students to si t facing each other. Tell students not to look at each other's maps. Explain that the maps are the same, but each student has information about places that their partner is looking for. Tell them that the places marked in bold are on both maps. Then students take turns to ask their partner Where can I go to download The sandwich bar is on Oak Avenue next to the pub, opposite the supermarket.

Students label the correct places on their maps. Follow-up 1 In their pai rs, students look at the maps together and take turns to say where places are. Z After a few minutes one student turns thei r map over and their partner tests their memory by asking them where places are. Students win one point for each correct answer. After Student A has asked six questions, they turn over their map and Student B can ask Student A six questions Homework A Choose six faci lities in your town and write sentences to describe their location using expressions of place.

B Write a paragraph about some of the places you visited in a town recently and what you did there. A Where can I go to: Finding places.. Ask them to find the word pairs for places in a town. Main activity 1 Explain that students are going to make a story about an incident that happened in town yesterday, using all the word pairs they have made. Write the following sentence on the board: Yesterday I was standing by the bus stop when I saw a strange man carrying a briefcase.

The sentence must contain another word pai r. Write the sentence on the board, underli ne the word pair and tell students to put those cards to one side.

Students have to use one of their word pairs in the sentence and lay down t he word pair on the table. The first student to lay down all t heir cards is the winner. Variation This activity can be made more challenging by adding a memory element When students lay down their cards and say their sentence, t hey first have to say the previous sentences in the correct order before they can say the1r new sentence.

If they cannot remember all the sentences, they miss a turn. FoDow-up Ask some pairs to tell their stories to the whole class. Then ask the class to vote on the best story they heard. Homework A Write down the story you made up in class and underline all the word pai rs you used. B Write down the word pairs in two li sts: My town has.. One set of 20 cards.

Write their ideas on the board. Introduce the words and expressions from the Key vocobuiary, if they don't come up spontaneously, and check that students understand them. Main activity 1 Divide students into groups of four and give each student in the group a set of five of the cards, including one blank.

Tell students in the same group to think of different problems from any of those their other group members have. The groups have to compile a list of the top ten problems they would like to spend the budget on. Val'iation With smaller cl asses, divide students into pai rs and give each student ten cards, incl uding two blank cards for them to fill in.

Together students discuss the issues they feel are most important and together they must create a list of the top ten issues. Follow-up Tell students to look at all the lists on the board. As a whole class they decide on a top ten list Homework A Choose one of the problems di scussed in class and write down some ideas for dealing with it. B Write an essay of - words on the advantages and disadvantages of city I if e.

Vocabulary activities

Refer to at least eight of the issues you discussed in class. I City life.. Black Sea. Middle Bast. Saudi Arabia. South America, Switzerland. United States borders on. Olympic Games. Then divide students into pairs and ask them to compare thei r lists with each other. Europe, Asia, America, Australasia, Africa. Ask the students to call out the names of countri es from their lists and tell you which column you should write them in. Main activity 1 Divide students into groups of four.

Give one student in each group a copy of the crossword, one a copy of the A clues, one a copy of the 8 dues and one a copy of the C dues.

Give one group the A clues, one the B clues and one the C dues. In these three groups students list all the countries they can think of whi ch might be an answer to each clue. Then regroup the students so that there is one A, one B and one C student in each group. Together they work out what they think the answers will be before they see the crossword grid.

Then give each group a copy of the crossword. Ask them to check their answers and complete the grid. Follow-up Divide st udents into pairs. Tell them to choose three different countries and write a clue for each of them. Then ask students to work with another pair and read out their clues for the other pair to guess the countries. Homework A List the names of all the countries from the crossword together with the name of their capital city and the main national language.

B Wri te six sentences about which of the countries in the crossword you would most li ke to visit and why. Down This country is famous for bacon and butter. Down 1 The capital city of this country begins with the letter C. Down This country is in the north of Europe. Materials For Warm-up. A month on a desert island: American English phrasebook. Ask them where they went, what they did and what they took with them. Elicit the vocabulary for the items and ask students what kind of holiday the items would be useful for.

Main activity 1 Divide the cl ass into groups of four and explain that each member of the group is going on a di fferent kind of adventure holiday. Tell students to take one Holiday card each and to divide the Item cards equally between them. Tell students to now look at thei r cards but to keep them hidden from the rest of the group. The items roughly correspond to seven per holiday. However the possibility that more than one person might want certain items makes the activity more interesti ng, as they then have to negotiate.

They can address any other member of the group. Either the student can request a particular item from another person, e. Do you hove a bicycle pump? If the person has that item, they give it to the student. Or the student can offer another person an item which t hey do not want to keep, e. I hove a mop of the Himalayas. Do you need it? If the person needs that item they take it and give the student one of their 1tems which they do not need in return. Variation Divide students into groups of four.

Give each student seven item cards and one holiday card. Tell students that they have to justify to the others in the group why each of the items would be useful for thei r parti cular holiday.

They get a point for each item that they can justify to the satisfaction of the rest of the group. Follow-up Divide students into groups of people with the same holi day card. Ask the groups to compare the items they chose. Were there any differences? Who had the best set of seven items? Ask students to list ten more thi ngs they would take on a holiday of thi s kind.

Homework A List all the things that you usually li ke to take with you on holiday. B Write a story of - words that begins or ends with the words Thank goodness I had taken it on holiday with me.! Tell the students to write these nouns in a list down one si de of a piece of paper. Check that they understand each of the words. There is no need to elicit the exact vocabulary used in the activity because this will emerge during the activity. Main activity 1 Divide the students into groups of three to four.

There is a range of possible collocati ons, so encourage students to see how many different coll ocations they can find, using dictionaries if necessary. There are at least three possible adjectives for each noun. Check some coll ocations with the class and write any difficult vocabulary on the board.

Then ask students to turn the cards face down and spread them on the table, the nouns on one half, the adjectives on the other. The first student turns over two cards - one adjective and one noun - and places them on the table so that the others can see.

If they say 'yes' , the student has to produce a sentence using the collocation correctly. The rest of the group judges whether the sentence is acceptable, and if it is, the student keeps the two cards. The students continue, until all the noun cards have been taken. Variation For a quicker game, students play in groups of three to four and begin by selecting just one Adjective ca rd to match each of the twenty Noun cards.

They then play with those forty cards and put the unwanted ca rds aside. They place the forty cards face down on the table Players take it in turns to turn over two cards.

If they find a collocating pai r, they keep the cards and have another turn. If they do not find a pair, they put back the two cards in the same places. The winner is the player with most cards at the end of the game. FoUow-up Discuss with the class which of the possible collocations tor each noun would be most appropriate for the area where they are. Homework A Write the text for a tourist brochure based either on a picture, or their memory of a place they know well.

I countryside 1: UNIT 1 Food and drink 7. What I had for dinner last night. Ask students to write 'a n ' or 'some' next to the name, e. Main activity 1 Divi de students into groups of four to eight students. Give each group a set of picture cards, cut up, including the four blank cards. The first student picks a card, e.

Vocabulary activities

The student keeps that card. Each student has to list all the previous cards in the correct order before they say what is on their card. If they cannot remember a card, the student w1th that card shows it to them as a clue. If a student picks a blank card, they can choose their own food item. Variation For a more challenging game, each time it is their turn students name two food items - one that is pictured on the card and one that they choose themselves, e.

I had a lemon and a hot dog for dinner last night. They can choose any item as long as it has not been mentioned by another student If they choose a blank card, they only need to name one item Follow.. Homework A Write a grid of menus for a three-course meal for each day of the week. Choose different food for each day of the week, using items from the sheet and your own ideas, e.

I apricot beans. Is it a vegetable? Con you fry it? If they have not guessed after asking 20 questions, tell them the answer. Go through the questions with them and elicit or explai n any of the words that they do not understand. Check they understand all the food items. Main activity 1 Divide students into groups of f1ve to six. Give each group one set of picture cards and tell them to place them face down in a pil e on the table.

Vocabulary pdf for games practice

Ask students to fold over the sheet from the Warm-up so that they can only see the questions 2 Students take it in turns to pick a card. If the group has not guessed the word by question 20, the student wins a point and shows the group the picture. The student with the most points wins. Variation Instead of cutting up the pictures, allow students to choose any food item they want from the sheet. They shoul d not choose an item which has already been used once Follow-up In their groups of five to six, ask students to look at t he sheet and plan a meal for the1r classmates using the food ill ustrated.

They should try to use as many as possible of the words in the questions to describe how they would prepare the meal. Then each group presents their suggestion to the rest of the class and the class votes on the most appetising meal. Homework A Write a recipe using as many as possible of the words from the act1vity. B Write down each of the verbs in questions 5 and 6 together with two things that could be used as objects for the verb, e.

You can grate cheese and carrots. Warm-up 1 Give each pair of students an envelope containing a set of picture cards and ask them to spread them out in front of them. Describe yourself in five sentences without mentioning your name. I am a woman. My hair is short, not long. After five sentences, ask students to guess who the person is.

Then elicit any other words from the Key vocabulary that your students need to know. Main activity 1 Give each student an envelope containing a set of picture cards. Students then play in their pairs. Student A puts all their pictures face up on the table. Student B pretends to be the person on the picture. Are you female? If B says 'yes', then A can put all the male pictures to one side. Have you got dark hair? If B says 'no', then A can put all the pictures of women with dark hair to one side.

Follow-up Ask a student to describe another student in the class without naming them, by giving information about their hair, their clothes, etc. The other students try to guess who is being described.

Homework A Choose four pictures from the sheet Imagine that the people in the pictures all know each other. Write a paragraph about them. Describe them and also invent more informati on about them. For example, Emily and Anna are sisters. Anna is tall and slim with short curly hair. Dave is Anno's boyfriend He is a student. B Write a description of the people in your family, using the vocabulary from the activity.

Games for Vocabulary Practice | Classroom | Vocabulary

First parts of compound adjectives: Appearance big-eyed, blue-eyed. In the far left column wnte the first parts of the compounds as listed in lhe Key vocabulary, in the next column the second parts.

At the top of the third and fourth columns write Appearance and Character respectively. Main activity Give each group a set of dominoes. The next student places one of their dominoes either before or after it to form a compound adjective. If it 1s impossible, the player keeps that domino and play passes to the next student 5 The winner is the fi rst student to use all of their dominoes.

If there is time, students can shuffle the dominoes and play the game again. The rest of the class decides whether they agree with all the compounds. Discuss any new or difficult vocabulary. Variation Students work in pai rs with one set of dominoes. They produce as long a continuous line of dominoes as possible, so that compound nouns are formed as you pass from one domino lo the next, e. Students may place dominoes to the left or the right of the line.

Stop after an appropriate time. The pai r with the longest continuous line wins. Follow-up 1 Divide the students into pairs and tell them to write down the names of all the students in the class.

Ask students to write down one compound adjective to describe each student They should not write the same adjective for more than one student. Homework A Write down all the compound adjectives from this activity that could be used to describe your appearance and character. B Write down ten compound adjectives from the activity hat you particularly want to learn and find two coll ocating nouns for them, e.

Acknowledgement Th1s 1dea was 1nspi red by the word-bui lding domino games devised by Paul Davis and Mario Rinvolucri. UNIT 8 Describing people 8. You and your students Will come up with many more possibilities.

Check that students understand these categories. Z Point to the categories in turn and name any letter of the alphabet. Ask students to think of a word in ti1at catego1y beginning with that letter. Ask students to suggest a word in that category beginning with each letter of the alphabet, excluding X and Z. Main activity 1 Divide students into groups of four to five Give each group a dice and the sheet.

Each player needs two counters e. If they land on a blank space, play immediately passes to the next player. It their space has words, they throw the dice again and move their other counter along the Letter board, starting at AB.

They have to name something in the category where they landed on the Game board, beginning with one of the letters where they landed on the Letter board. This student also notes down the categories and letters which made players mi ss a turn. The first player to name an appropriate word can move their counter forward to the next blank square. Find some answers for such combinations with the whole class. Then ask them to act their word for the rest of the class to guess. Homework A Write a paragraph describing someone you know.

Use at least two words from each category in the board game. B Fi nd a description of someone from an English-language novel. Write words commenting on how good the description is and why. The people's alphabet game 1: Check answers with the whole class and elicit the names of the objects.

Write up any new vocabulary on the board. They shoul d not write anything during this time. After one mi nute, students turn over their sheets and, in pairs, write down as many words as possible. Check answers and see which pair correctly remembered the most words. You may wish to bring in real objects for the Warm-up. For step 3, pl ace ten or more objects on a table that all students can see. Allow them one minute to memorise the objects, before you cover them with a cloth or coat.

The students then have to write down the objects they remember. Main activity 1 Give each student a set of picture cards, cut up. The cards can be in any order. Make sure each student also has about 12 counters, these can be coins or small pieces of paper. If a student has a picture of that ObJect in front of them, they put a counter on the picture.

The first student to complete a vertical, diagonal or horizontal row of counters is the winner. FoUow-up Divide students into pai rs. Students take turns to pick a card from their set and descri be it to their partner. Their partner has to guess the name of the object. Homework A Think of six more everyday objects and write a descript ion of each one. Bring your descriptions to the next cl ass and see if your classmates can guess what the objects are.

B Choose six of the objects from the sheet and write a different description for each one. Try to elicit the words from the Key vocabulary section, although your students may come up with additional points of detai l. Write any new vocabulary on the board. Main activity 1 Ask students to look at the sheet carefully for one minute and try to remember where the objects are on it. After one minute coll ect the sheets. Tell them to divide a blank page into twenty squares.

They should describe, not draw, the objects. Gi ve them an additional point for each detai l of description that they wrote, e. Variation Bring in as many objects that correspond to the pictures on the sheet as possible. It is not necessary to find all the objects - ten would be enough. It is also not necessary to have Identical objects - your cracked cup might have a different picture on it, for example.

After doing the Warm-up activity, show your students your objects and elicit how they differ. Then place your objects in a specific order on a table or tray that all the students can see. Ask them to memorise the order.

Then cover the obj ects with a blanket or coat and ask the students in pairs, or individually as preferred, to write down where and what the objects were. Stop after about five minutes and give points as in the Main activity above. Follow-up 1 Give each student a set of cards. Student B may then look at the cards for ten seconds. After this Student B must turn round and try to arrange thei r cards in exactly the same order. They may ask their partner questions to help them with the ones they cannot remember, e.

Where's the chipped mug? When Student B has found the correct order, it is their turn to arrange their cards for Student A Homework A Write descriptions of the objects on the sheet but this time change one aspect of the descript1on, e.

In the next lesson show your description to a partner who has to identify what the differences are between your descriptions and the original pictures.

B Cut out ten pictures of objects from a magazine and stick them in rows on a sheet of paper to make a new Kim's game for your class to play. On a separate sheet, write a brief description of each object in the same place as on the sheet you have made. Use your sheet of pictures in another lesson to play Kim's game again with a group of st udents.

Monitor and help as necessary. Remind students that they can write negative as well as positive sentences, e.

I didn't write on email this morning. Possible answers are suggested in the Key vocabulary section, but you or your students may well have many other interesting ways of completi ng the statements.

Main activity You need a large clear area with no tables for this activity. If this is not possible, use the Variation. With very large classes, you may prefer to split the students into two or three groups. There should be one chair in the orde less than the number of students. The remaining student stands in the centre. Change places with someone if you ate cornflakes for breakfast today. While all those students who ate cornflakes for breakfast are changing places, the student in the middle tries to find a seat in the circl e.