musicmarkup.info Guides SHARPES TIGER EBOOK

SHARPES TIGER EBOOK

Friday, July 26, 2019 admin Comments(0)

This content was uploaded by our users and we assume good faith they have the permission to share this book. If you own the copyright to this book and it is. Sharpe; Volume number 1. Sharpe's Tiger. The Siege of Seringapatam, FREE shipping on musicmarkup.info To read e-books on the BookShout App, download it on. Sharpe's Tiger is the first historical novel in the Richard Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell and was first published in Sharpe is a private in the British.


Author:WALTRAUD BALNIS
Language:English, Spanish, Dutch
Country:Uruguay
Genre:Politics & Laws
Pages:130
Published (Last):16.02.2015
ISBN:669-3-18865-454-9
ePub File Size:29.55 MB
PDF File Size:8.34 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:33225
Uploaded by: KALLIE

Series: Sharpe (No. 1) From New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell, the first exciting adventure in the world-renowned Sharpe series, chronicling the rise of Richard Sharpe, a Private in His Majesty’s Army at the siege of Seringapatam. Richard Sharpe. From New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell, the first exciting adventure in the world-renowned*** ***Sharpe series, chronicling the rise of Richard Sharpe, a Private in His Majesty’s Army at the siege of Seringapatam. Richard Sharpe. He knows no other family than the. Editorial Reviews. Review. “Page-turners [that] fan clubs all over the world are devoted to. File Size: KB; Print Length: pages; Page Numbers Source ISBN: ; Publisher: HarperCollins e-books (October 13, ).

This and the succeeding two novels set in India provide the back story to Sharpe's army life, filling in the stories mentioned in the later novels set in the Napoleonic wars in Europe and showing how this private began his climb up the ranks of the British army, a possible but rare event in that era. It takes place in Mysore , India and tells of Sharpe's adventures and triumphs against the Tipu Sultan during the Siege of Seringapatam in Plot summary Richard Sharpe is a private with the British army, then invading Mysore and advancing on the Tippoo Sultan's capital city of Seringapatam. Sharpe is contemplating desertion with his paramour, widow Mary Bickerstaff. His sadistic company sergeant, Obadiah Hakeswill, deliberately provokes Sharpe into attacking him, and engineers the virtual death sentence of 2, lashes for the private. But Sharpe is rescued by Lieutenant William Lawford after lashes are inflicted, in order to effect a rescue mission behind the Tippoo's lines. Although Lawford is nominally in command, Sharpe quickly dominates the lieutenant by force of personality and, without authorization, brings Mary on the mission.

Sharpe does something noble even though he hates doing it: Sharpe pretends to be dumber than he is as a plot point: And that's just in the first t Ah, the delicious historical crack that is the Sharpe series. And that's just in the first twenty pages! View all 8 comments. Jan 10, Jason Koivu rated it liked it Shelves: India, tigers and Richard Sharpe? Where are we? What happened to my Napoleonic War historical fiction series? Once upon a time Bernard Cornwell's series following Rifleman Richard Sharpe's career in Wellington's army during the Napoleonic Wars began in media res.

The embattled rifleman was stuck in with his brothers on the European continent fighting a losing war. After the originals were finished, Cornwell restarted the series and although this prequel is decent, showcasing his improved writing, India, tigers and Richard Sharpe? After the originals were finished, Cornwell restarted the series and although this prequel is decent, showcasing his improved writing, I would've liked to have seen more of a character de-transformation, sending him back in time.

This retains too much of what the man would later become. Sharpe is too cool, too confident in Tiger. Don't get me wrong, there's some good stuff here. The history is laid on nicely with Sharpe essentially doing battle with a sultan during England's colony period in India. Old friendemies return like the despicable Sgt Hakeswill. The action is occasionally fun and exciting, as per usual.

However, it all feels inconsequential, perhaps because the ultimate evil isn't Napoleon in this instance. When the original series ended in a natural fashion soon after Waterloo, Cornwell realized he had a good thing going, so he wrote quite a few prequels and additions to stick in between the existing timeline. They feel a tad rushed, a little forced. It's like he's pushing them into the timeline and pushing them out publishing-wise, because he's got a cash-cow on his hands.

Who could blame him? But even without blame, one wishes more time and tenderness was implemented in rendering his rough-and-ready, tenderless soldier.

It's still good, action-packed historical fiction, but Cornwell can do better. You know he can, because he's done it before. View all 13 comments. Nov 17, Shannon rated it liked it Shelves: This is the first in the James Bond style Sharpe series, focusing on Sharpe's earlier times in the British regiment as a private. It's close to the turn of the century. Through luck and desperation, Sharpe goes undercover with a lieutenant to rescue a colonel from a fortified enemy city.

This colonel is vital because he has crucial information for the British to take the town succ This is the first in the James Bond style Sharpe series, focusing on Sharpe's earlier times in the British regiment as a private. This colonel is vital because he has crucial information for the British to take the town successfully. A fun enough read but I find myself enjoying Cornwell's non-Sharpe novels the most.

I still remember the Eastern Indians ruler who executed people by pounding a spike into the back of their head. The weakest part of the wall was another piece which comes to mind. An excellent beginning to a great series, if you like historical fiction. Sharpe is not a nice guy, but he's not a bad man, either. As he says in one place - he's not a rapist, but he's lied, murde An excellent beginning to a great series, if you like historical fiction.

Above all, he's a tough man in a tough situation who manages to survive. There were also VHS tapes available from the library for a while. View all 16 comments. I had a ton of fun with this book.

Tiger ebook sharpes

I have to insist I'm pretty sure I brought this up in another Cornwell review but whatever that this might be a better way to get into history than being forced to look at dusty textbooks when you're six, if someone had handed me a copy of this book when I was like 10 it would have sparked my interest in history way earlier, and I think it would do the same for most pe I had a ton of fun with this book. I have to insist I'm pretty sure I brought this up in another Cornwell review but whatever that this might be a better way to get into history than being forced to look at dusty textbooks when you're six, if someone had handed me a copy of this book when I was like 10 it would have sparked my interest in history way earlier, and I think it would do the same for most people.

I mean, obviously this idea has its drawbacks and reasons to prevent it from happening, but seriously, it's just for me probably the most fun way to learn about this stuff.

But I digress. As far as the guy the books are named after, he's obviously very charismatic and likable but is flawed enough to be interesting and not too much of a Mary Sue. He's brave, smart, loyal and relatively compassionate, but at the same time he enjoys killing people a bit too much, isn't above looting dead dudes and was a criminal before his career in the army.

This kind of juxtaposition keeps it interesting for me. I mean, you're not gonna get any stunningly insightful characterization from Cornwell but no one should be reading these books for that. There were so many entertaining parts of this book that I want to talk about but it would spoil the good stuff for anyone who might read this.

As always, Cornwell has a ton of action in his story and the climactic assault on Seringapatam is pretty thrilling. Lots of dudes firing rockets in every possible direction, musket volleys galore, stuff blowing up real nice, people getting eaten by tigers A minor complaint I do have is that Cornwell gives little to no impression of the geography and landscape of India itself, which is something I liked a lot about the Saxon stuff. Obviously he's more familiar with England but I still noticed and missed it.

Before I wrap this up, I just have to mention who I consider to be Cornwell's greatest success in villain creation; Sergeant Obadiah Hakeswill. What a fucking evil creep. I'm sure he'll eventually get murdered by Sharpe but I hope I see a lot more of him before that happens.

Sharpe's Tiger

It's awesome that Cornwell wrote so many of these books, I look forward to reading them. People mention that Cornwell's formulaic but I mean, that's what most of his readers including myself want from him; reliably entertaining and relatively educational books where the good guys always go through crazy shit and beat the bad guys.

If Cornwell embarked on some weird free-association Faulkner trip and published a bunch of books in that style I'd be pissed or maybe it'd be awesome.

View all 18 comments. Dec 07, Christopher Bunn rated it it was amazing. I've read and re-read the Sharpe series countless times. For me, they're arguably one of the finest collections of historical fiction written. Cornwell knows what he's doing and does it well. There are some easy potshots to take at the books. The biggest one is that each book is essentially the same plot: Sharpe is thrown into an underdog fight, he saves the girl, and emerges victorious against all odds.

However, that's fairly irrelevant due to everything else the books have to offer. Cornwell p I've read and re-read the Sharpe series countless times. Cornwell packs in the historical detail, weaving it seamlessly into the fiction of Sharpe's character.

Reading through the entire series, we're given a superb look at the military career of Wellington, as well as the Napoleonic war, from the political maneuvering of the London politicians, to the allied tensions of Spain and Portugal, the conditions on the ground for the foot soldiers, and the heart-breaking triumphs and tragedies of the various campaigns of the British Army.

Cornwell draws Sharpe with a careful hand, creating an affable protagonist with just enough of the anti-hero in him to provide logical motivation for his frequent and ruthless savagery. He also spends the time to create fascinating three-dimensional supporting characters, from the loathsome villain Obadiah Hakeswill, to Sharpe's comrade-in-arms Harper.

In addition, the obligatory female love-interest in each book is also given careful attention, resulting in complex characters with equally complex roles and motivations. It's a superb series, a bit on the violent side, but I can't recommend them highly enough. Sharpe's Tiger is a wonderful beginning, set in India during some of the rajah wars of the British East India Company.

Sharpe begins there as a lowly private, of course, and while it's a long journey from the Indian subcontinent to the conclusion of the Napoleonic wars, rest assured that it's a delightful one, with excellent companions.

I don't have much of an opinion on that, as I've only seen part of one episode. Review in Portuguese from Desbravando Livros: E, de um jeito ou de outro, os abutres esbaldavam-se. O sargento acaba sendo um homem de humor extremo, mas de uma vontade maior ainda de acabar com a alegria dos homens.

Estavam contagiados pela loucura de Baird. Nesse momento, enraivecidos pelo calor inclemente e embriagados pela araca e pelo rum bebido durante a longa espera nas trincheiras, os casacas vermelhas eram deuses da guerra. Baird conquistaria esta cidade ou morreria em sua poeira.

View all 10 comments. Nov 08, David rated it really liked it Shelves: This excellent historical novel is the first in a series about Richard Sharpe, a soldier in the British army in The army is setting out to attack a city in southern India.

Unfortunately, the leader of the city, the Tippoo, has set up a brilliant trap to surprise the attackers. Although Sharpe was a thief before joining the army, he is a very clever, intelligent, likable rogue. Nevertheless, Sharpe is bedeviled by a hateful, cowardly British sergeant. In the middle of a brutal flogging, Shar This excellent historical novel is the first in a series about Richard Sharpe, a soldier in the British army in In the middle of a brutal flogging, Sharpe is unwittingly saved by a general, and ordered to join an officer to spy on the Indian city.

Once in the city, Sharpe and the officer pretend to be British deserters, and join a battalion of European soldiers. He finds that the commander, a French officer, is actually quite a compassionate, intelligent human being who treats his subordinates with dignity.

This is in stark contrast with British officers, who treat their soldiers with contempt as sub-human cannon fodder. This is a fine adventure story, filled with action and a big dose of violence. Bernard Cornwell tells a great story, one that closely follows the historical record. The story is quite believable, but at times becomes melodramatic, as coincidental events occur "just in time".

I didn't read this book--I listened to it as an audiobook. The narrator, Frederick Davidson, does a fantastic job bringing all of the characters to life.

There are many accents; English, Irish, Scottish, Indian, and French--and Davidson plays them well in the numerous dialogues. View all 5 comments. Apr 03, Hadrian rated it liked it Shelves: Even if this may be 'formulaic', Cornwell writes it very well.

Dashing roguish anti-heroes, savage battles, a fun cast of stock characters, all here. The book reads very quickly, too. I read the whole thing in an hour this morning instead of sampling a chapter. Cornwell has a talent, no doubt there. Even his historical notes and documentation of sources are still treats to read. Good brain candy. There's no getting away from it, Bernard Cornwell knows how to mix fact and fiction together and successfully turn it into a highly entertaining adventure.

Richard Sharpe is to 's what Jack Reacher is the 's.

A man not to be messed with, under any circumstances. The main difference between the two is, with Sharpe you also get a history lesson to help broaden your horizons. Richard Sharpe is at heart a good guy but he is not above doing some skulduggery to improve his circumstances. For ev There's no getting away from it, Bernard Cornwell knows how to mix fact and fiction together and successfully turn it into a highly entertaining adventure.

For every hero there has to be a villain and the villain in Sharpe's life is sergeant Obadiah Hakeswill, who for whatever reason, just loves to make Sharpe's life as miserable as possible. This particular tale take place during the siege and successful capture of Srirangapatna which ended the rule of The Tippoo Sultan of Mysore. Needless to say, none of this would have been possible without the help of Private Richard Sharpe. This is a highly entertaining history lesson and comes with a 4 star recommendation.

View 2 comments. Mar 14, Sud rated it it was amazing Shelves: I'm a big fan of Bernard Cornwell and loved his Saxon Swords series. I'd heard of Sharpe, but this was my first time reading it. Luckily I started with the first book in the series. His Regiment is going to fight Tippoo Sultan of Mysore. This fascinating journey takes you into a British Army regiment of the late 's Cornwell's descriptions are spot on and a pleasure to read.

Complex concepts like the operational plan to take Seringapatam are explained, through narrative, in an understandable way. The story is quite exciting and fairly accurate to real history.

Along the way we see Sharpe run afoul of the awful Sgt. Hakeswill, go on a secret mission and eventually help the British in their conquest of the city.

I generally believe that with historical fiction books there can be no spoilers say what? The British eventually controlled India?! Um Yeah Heck, even a young Col. Arthur Wellesley eventually to become Duke of Wellington and a bane of Napoleon makes an appearance. Sharpe reminds me of Uthred, from the Saxon Tales, a capable warrior who sometimes gets on the wrong side of more powerful people.

But I liked Sharpe and the fact that he got his revenge in the end-something Uthred always had an issue with. Good for Sharpe! On a historical note- the fact that Cornwall has a mine be the reason for the breached wall would be disputed by historians since there was a mysterious explosion two days before the assault, but likely caused my artillery hitting a munitions dump. But it makes for a good story. Also kudos to making sure Tippoo was a Muslim. There has been an unfortunate trend in SJW revisionist Indian historians, who view Tippoo as a proto-independence fighter, to project him as a secret Hindu.

He wasn't. Not even a teeny tiny bit. Plus while he was anti-British, he ruled over a Hindu city and would have allowed in the French instead. So not exactly a "pro-India" kinda guy. Especially not a Hindu India. He was, however, a truly brave individual and gets his due credit in the story. But those two asides don't detract from the overall excellence of this period piece of military historical fiction set in India during Consider me a Sharpe fan.

Nov 07, Hayat rated it really liked it Shelves: My brother introduced me to the Sharpe series such a long time ago and I read about half of the books in this series sadly not in chronological order with such enthusiasm and a burning desire to see what happens next that I even surprised myself.

Richard Sharpe's adventures in the British army from onwards, the struggles, discrimination and the disappointments he faces as well as the enemies and friends he makes in his long career in the army was a compelling read. I even became a fan of My brother introduced me to the Sharpe series such a long time ago and I read about half of the books in this series sadly not in chronological order with such enthusiasm and a burning desire to see what happens next that I even surprised myself.

I can't wait to reread them this year, especially since I've forgotten most of the characters and many of the details in the plot except the main ones so It'll feel brand new.

There are a whopping 21 books in this series so it'll take me a while to get through them all but I'm up for the challenge this year.

Ebook sharpes tiger

View all 11 comments. The story is filled with interesting characters, an exotic locale and exciting action and espionage all set against the background of a British Army Battalion in Characters In reading other reviews, some readers complained that the characters were flat and one-dimensional.

I have to respectfully disagree. While the characters may not be developed to point you may find in a Tana French nov A rousing 4 Stars Sharpe's Tiger , my first foray into the world of Bernard Cornwell, was a success!

While the characters may not be developed to point you may find in a Tana French novel, there is sufficient development of the major players for the reader to be concerned about their well being and keep the cheering for their safety or death.

The main character, Richard Sharpe, is more on an anti-hero. Unlike the majority of characters of HF novels focusing on British Army, Richard Sharpe is not paralysed by his sense of morality. Given that he does not automatically choose "the high road" this leads to more satisfying plot turns. Setting The setting is India in The British Army is at war with the Tippo, a Muslim Leader in a Hindu nation, for the purpose of securing their trade routes and keeping the French at bay.

I have read many novels set in this period but this is first set in India. Personally, I found the setting to be both intriguing and exotic. The setting provided an interesting mix of Christian, Hindu and Muslim elements.

This alone provided an interesting mix of plot points and characters. Plot In short, a former thief and would-be deserter, Richard Sharpe, finds himself given an opportunity to literally save his hide. In saving his hide, he is forced to put in right back into danger by accepting a mission from his commanding officers that if both important to the war at hand and, by all accounts, likely bound for failure.

The reason my rating was only 4 stars is the story takes a while to get off the ground. One Sharpe makes his deal that will seal his fate, the excitement level increased substantially. There are elements of the story that are not for the faint of heart. The descriptions of violence are more graphic than many other such HF novels. There are scenes of floggings, gun battles and public executions that have liberal descriptions of blood and various crunching sounds. Overall, an exciting book and great start to the series.

I am looking forward to reading on. Jan 11, Shane rated it it was amazing. A friend of mine has been trying to get me into the Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell for about a year now. A few months back I went ahead and downloadd the first 3 books in the long running series and finally got around to reading book one, Sharpe's Tiger. My friend described it as a great series for when you need something light or a break from your traditional genre.

I'd say he summed it up perfectly. It's my first book by BC and only my second foray into Historical Fiction. I'm excited to c A friend of mine has been trying to get me into the Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell for about a year now. I'm excited to continue the series and am looking forward to Sharpe's next adventure. The writing was good but lulled at times and I felt a few characters never got wrapped up in the end.

Sergeant Green and General Baird to name a couple. Those are really my only complaints with an otherwise entertaining novel. I really liked the historical notes section at the end and was surprised to learn just how much of the book was actually based on facts. I was also impressed with the amount of research that went into getting the details right. That category being Light Adventure or Historical Fiction. Jan 09, Jason , etc. Bloody hell. In order to confuse all future readers of these books, Bernard Cornwell wrote them out of order.

This is actually the first of the Sharpe's series, but was actually written years after the first Sharpe's book was published. Whatever, dude. This was abso-goddamn-lutely amazing. I listened to this during a long drive as I do and at first, the reader's British accent was so incredibly Eton-esque, dripping with the posh sensibilities of the dandiest of British dandies, that I was worri Bloody hell.

I listened to this during a long drive as I do and at first, the reader's British accent was so incredibly Eton-esque, dripping with the posh sensibilities of the dandiest of British dandies, that I was worried about how he could possibly act out a member of the lowest ranks of the 18th-century British army.

Turns out I shouldn't have judged a voice by its …. Anyhow, he did an amazing job of capturing all of the characters, including members of the East India Company and their muslim enemies. But the writing and the story and the pacing and the battle scenes and the hate and the anger and the blood and the spittle All of this in addition to the fact that the author's daughter is this person and what you end up with is something damn near perfect.

View 1 comment.

Sharpe’s Tiger | XOXO After Dark

Picture Jason Statham. As an illiterate private in the British Army. Napoleonic Wars. Kicking ass and taking names. Do you have a picture in your mind? That picture probably bears a resemblance to Bernard Cornwell's swashbuckling protagonist Private Richard Sharpe in this series of novels. I found quite a few of these novels a few years back at a used book sale and as I share a last name with the protagonist, I thought, what the hey? I'll read these.

And finally I did. And I am glad Picture Jason Statham. And I am glad. You see, I loooove Jason Statham movies. And I couldn't help but put my favorite action hero in the place of Richard Sharpe as I'm reading.

Bernard Cornwell is an incredible character writer in my opinion. For a novel that is heavily plot based, I really felt I could picture each character, know their background, see what they looked like, and even heard them speaking in their cockney british accents throughout.

He captured each character's quirks and idiosyncrasies in a way I have not found with a lot of other writers. Because of this, the novel really read quickly. Especially for someone who really doesn't know much about the war strategies of 18th and 19th century British soldiers.

I could see the entire plot play out before me and could see the scenery and could see Jason Statham in the middle. Making his own rules. Ignoring authority. The action is set in in India during the historical battle of Seringpatam in which the British forces were trying to oust the Muslim Tipoo Sultan from the throne of Mysore. The sultan is obsessed I mean Obsessed with tigers. His men wear tiger-striped uniforms.

They carry swords and muskets with tiger heads carved into them. He has about 12 dozen sculptures and statues and jewels carved into tigers. He has 6 or 7 man-eating tigers as pets! Like I said, Cornwell captures well the idiosyncrasies of his characters Sharpe and a British Lieutenant must pose as deserters and fight against their own men in the Tipoo's army in order to gain intelligence from a captured Scottish spy. What ensues is a fun albeit cheesy at times plot where the illiterate private must find ways to conquer the Tippoo and save his own men.

All on his own. With god-like strength. Invictus Eagles of the Empire The Dark of the Sun. Killer of Kings. The Seventh Scroll. Gentleman Captain. The Burning Shore. Gate of the Dead. Eagle in the Sky. The Leopard Hunts in Darkness. Day of the Caesars Eagles of the Empire Altar of Blood: Empire IX. A Falcon Flies. The Word Is Murder. Anthony Horowitz. The Encircling Sea. Adrian Goldsworthy. Margaret of Anjou. Rome's Lost Son.

The Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell

Sons of Taranis. Shout at the Devil. The Flame Bearer. Warriors of the Storm. The Saxon Tales Collection: Books The Pale Horseman. The Empty Throne. The Pagan Lord. Gallows Thief. Sharpe's Sword. Fools and Mortals. The Winter King. The Last Kingdom. Death of Kings. Enemy of God. The Fort. Sharpe's Siege 9. The Archer's Tale. Sharpe's Regiment 8. Sharpe's Company. Sharpe's Eagle. The Bloody Ground. Battle Flag. A Crowning Mercy. Waterloo The Fallen Angels. Sharpe's Rifles 1.

Sharpe's Revenge Sharpe's Gold. Sharpe's Enemy 6. Sharpe's Honor 7. The King Arthur Trilogy. The Sharpe Collection: How to write a great review.

The review must be at least 50 characters long. The title should be at least 4 characters long. Your display name should be at least 2 characters long. At Kobo, we try to ensure that published reviews do not contain rude or profane language, spoilers, or any of our reviewer's personal information. You submitted the following rating and review. We'll publish them on our site once we've reviewed them. Continue shopping. Item s unavailable for download. Please review your cart.

You can remove the unavailable item s now or we'll automatically remove it at Checkout. Remove FREE. Unavailable for download. Continue shopping Checkout Continue shopping. Chi ama i libri sceglie Kobo e inMondadori. download the eBook Price: Choose Store. In this series View all Book 2.