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'Euclid's Window' reviewed by Rachel Thomas. Euclid's Window: The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to Hyperspace. By Leonard Mlodinow. Anyone who . Fast get ebook Euclid's Window for Kindle - Epub Detective. Through Euclid's Window Leonard Mlodinow brilliantly and delightfully leads us on a journey through five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek concept of.


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Euclid's window: the story of geometry from parallel lines to hyperspace. Home · Euclid's window: the story of geometry from parallel lines to hyperspace. Euclid's Window is a clear exposition of the 'story of geometry' and the development of our understanding of the physical space that we live in, with a proper and. Review of Euclid's Window by Leonard Mlodinow. This is a shallow book on deep conviction that geometry is the legacy of Euclid and string theorists his heirs.

Page: Format: djvu By way of Euclid's Window Leonard Mlodinow brilliantly and delightfully sales opportunities us on a journey via five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek principle of parallel lines to the latest notions of hyperspace. Through Euclid's Window Leonard Mlodinow brilliantly and delightfully leads us on a journey through five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek concept of parallel lines to the latest notions of hyperspace. It was my first introduction to proof beyond the token gesture that I got in tenth grade geometry. Euclid's Window: The story of geometry from parallel lines to hyperspace. It is easy to compare for better price of Euclid's Window : The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to HyperspaceBy Leonard Mlodinow via price compare list from various dealers along with view more downloader reviews to assist your final decision before spend Through Euclid's Window Leonard Mlodinow brilliantly and delightfully leads us on a journey through five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek concept of parallel lines to the latest notions of hyperspace. Posted on Monday 29 March by dbv.

The first revolution The geometry of taxation -- 3. Among the seven sages -- 4. The secret society -- 5. Euclid's manifesto -- 6. A beautiful woman, a library, and the end of civilization -- pt. The story of Descartes -- 7. The revolution in place -- 8. The origin of latitude and longitude -- 9. The legacy of the rotten Romans -- The discreet charm of the graph -- A soldier's story -- Iced by the Snow Queen -- pt.

The story of Gauss -- Basically, this is not only a history of geometry, but also a history of our understanding of space itself. It starts in the ancient world with Egyptians and Babylonians marking out the ground, building pyramids and calculating approximations for Pi.

It ends with a discussion of string theory and the possible multi-dimensional space that is predicted in that. He takes us on this grand tour in a light-hearted and easy to follow narrative.

You literally do not need to even remember any of your high school geometry to enjoy this book. This also did something else I love — it gave lots of background to the lives of many of the scientists and mathematicians mentioned.

Here is a guy who understands that science progresses with questions, rather than answers. I started out fine and could follow well enough but as the book went on and the theories got more complex I had a harder and harder time keeping up and often had to reread a passage to understand it and sometimes never totally did.

It is well written and Mlodinow knows his stuff and his love of the topic comes through and infects the reader.

It's called Euclid's Window, but the view isn't really so inspiring in the opening chapters. My version had a glaring mistake on the first page! The previous borrower had helpfully and amusingly annotated my library copy. Makes me wonder if I could perhaps make it as a professional editor.

I mean, how hard can it be? Typos aside, this is a fairly pedestrian stroll through the key European developments in geometry from antiquity to the 20th century. The anecdotes are quite dry, and the explan It's called Euclid's Window, but the view isn't really so inspiring in the opening chapters. The anecdotes are quite dry, and the explanations aren't immediately elucidating. To me, popular science books should be easy enough to understand in a single pass.

Once I find myself having to re-read a page several times to work out what the author is trying to say, my enjoyment level begins to decline rapidly.

Pdf euclids window

If you want to feel inspired by mathematics or physics, I can heartily recommend Fermat's Last Theorem or Alex's Adventures in Numberland. However, this book does spark stutteringly into life at the turn of the 20th century. It's readily apparent where the author's interests lie, and I found the sections from Einstein's paradigm-shifting theories to string theory to be entertaining and educating in just the right proportions.

Aug 17, Georg rated it liked it Shelves: Jun 11, Lynn rated it it was ok. It started out good and then just fizzled out for me toward the end. His explanations were sometimes a little hokey and sometimes confusing. I got the feeling he was more interested in promoting string theory than explaining the history of mathematics.

Mar 10, Shashi Martynova rated it it was amazing Shelves: Nov 19, Tony rated it it was ok. He distorted and sensationalized history in an effort to be shocking and entertaining. It's less a history of geometry than a tabloid like account of the lives and discoveries of famous mathematicians and physicists. Aug 21, Murali Behara rated it it was amazing Shelves: Jul 19, Dubravka rated it really liked it Shelves: At times too cutesy for my taste.

Jan 11, Audrey rated it it was amazing. It may not be an overstatement to say that I learned more science from this book than I did in my secondary education. Big picture, key concept knowledge Gravity is a matter of perspective? Space and time, in one sense, don't really exist? There is no absolute distance Space may actually have 11 dimensions? Oh yeah, and time is different on the earth than it is on the sun. Since I graduated after this book was published, It may not be an overstatement to say that I learned more science from this book than I did in my secondary education.

Since I graduated after this book was published, it seems like someone really should have mentioned this. Thanks to further studies in math, I did know that space is curved and that the geometry of high school doesn't really describe the universe only locally, at some level.

Euclid's Window: The Story of Geometry from Parallel Lines to Hyperspace by Leonard Mlodinow

A triangle in space doesn't have degrees in its angles However, in the event that these are new ideas for my students, I'm looking forward to assigning this book this semester.

The writing was incredibly entertaining, and I loved the author's sense of humor. Some reviews accuse the book of an anti-Christian, Euro-centric bias. As a Christian, I bridled at a few statements, but there's no reason not to enjoy the book just because some statements were written from a different worldview.

Instead, there's room for discussion here. As for the Euro-centric perspective, this is probably correct. Sadly I am the product of a Euro-centric education, so I can't really say whether or not other cultures' contributions to geometry were minimized.

Other criticisms of the book attacked its historical inaccuracies and tendency to sensationalize key characters' biographies. I didn't find this to be overly true. I've read worse, and I felt like the author did a good job qualifying his interesting stories "legend has it," "he may have remarked something like" This style certainly suits my purposes: Favorite aspects of the book: Least favorite aspects: Also, I really hoped to see a stronger connection in the last chapter between string theory and non-Euclidean geometry.

This is just my own personal wish, as I'm using the book for a geometry class. While the book isn't perfect, I absolutely loved it and would recommend it to anyone wanting to learn more about geometry: In passing, Mr Moldinow mentioned the art perfected by schools and colleges in presenting Geometry as one of the most boring subjects. And also how he is going to change that view for his readers.

That too with the help of minimal number of diagrams. Before I start, let me say that I belong to the same category of people who have been bored with Geometry. And so, when I read this passage, where he promises to show how interesting a subject Geometry is, I was naturally very excited.

Euclid's window : the story of geometry from parallel lines to hyperspace

Even though I In passing, Mr Moldinow mentioned the art perfected by schools and colleges in presenting Geometry as one of the most boring subjects. Even though I am not a big fan of Geometry, elementary and high school Maths was always my go to subject. When I fared poorly in other subjects, I could point at Maths and be contended.

And my modest proficiency in elementary and high school maths helped me rush through the first few chapters.

Window pdf euclids

The details on how Greeks were the forefathers who laid the cornerstone for Maths and about various day to day activities for which they employed Maths. Then he talks about the great Pythagoras and other well known Greek mathematicians.

The way he explained Pythagoras theorem in words were commendable. It awed me when I found that this was the way how Pythagoras came up with the all famous equation. I felt some sort of electricity passing through me when I realized that I was made to think the same way Pythagoras did albeit he did it a couple hundred decades back. At times, the book gave the vibe of the ever famous book Cosmos by Carl Sagan. There were even same incidents mentioned in both the books.

Till now all was well. Then came the Euclidean theory. The author pens down his postulates and starts explaining it one by one. I could stay up with him till then. Then he starts talking about other mathematicians who later found flaws in these same postulates. Some are easy to understand while the rest make up for this easiness by making it much more difficult to comprehend. I was left open mouthed not knowing what was going around. I thought this would get better. But it went from worse to a complete train wreck.

Author started explaining the high end stuff in mere words and I was completely bamboozled.

He went from one mathematician to another Descartes to Gauss to Einstein and finally at Witten and I was still stuck in Euclid's parallel postulates.

Then I decided to let it be and started picking up words and how these eminent personalities lived. This attitude was what carried me till the end of the book. Or else I would have left the book half way. This lasted till he finished off with string theory, super string theory and M theory. In spite the book remaining something too much to understand, there were instances when I was left reeling on the floor laughing.

Pdf euclids window

The author is so good and spot on with his humor. When you feel dejected about not being able to follow what he is trying to say, he cracks a well timed joke which rejuvenates me and fuels me to read the next few pages. And the fact that he is an atheist was another factor which kept me going.

Window pdf euclids

There were a couple of instances in which he takes swipe at "GOD" and its so fucking hilarious. He even gave roles to his sons Nicolai and Alexei. Paul Curry's trick was magnificent. Jul 17, Becky rated it it was amazing. I listened to this as an audiobook, and thought it was fascinating. All of the historical anecdotes were relevant to the mathematical topics. As some other reviewers state, this book unapologetically leaves out mention of the development of geometry in other parts of the world.

H I listened to this as an audiobook, and thought it was fascinating. However I don't think that diminishes the quality of the material that is presented.

Euclid's window: the story of geometry from parallel lines to hyperspace

It is certainly a history of the geometry that is most commonly taught and accepted in schools today - for better or worse. I am not a mathematician and I am just becoming interested in learning more about math, and I thought this was a good introduction. If I ever get a hold of the physical book, I'll probably flip through it to get a better grasp of some of the concepts that were difficult for me to understand in the audiobook.

Favorite quotes: In one locale a scholar even complained that where he lived it was legal to kill mathematicians. This was probably due less to a disdain for nerds than to the mathematicians' habit of studying astrology, which through history was often connected with black magic and considered dangerous rather than amusing as it is today. Dec 18, Nadia rated it it was ok. This is a cute piece of pop-science that takes us through the history of the human understanding of space, from the Ancient Greeks to modern theories of quantums, strings and numerous dimensions that sound mysterious and strange.

And mysterious and strange remained even after reading the book, since the author doesn't do a great job at putting the "popular" in "popular science" as the things he's talking about grow more and more complex and seem to focus more on physics than math or geometry as This is a cute piece of pop-science that takes us through the history of the human understanding of space, from the Ancient Greeks to modern theories of quantums, strings and numerous dimensions that sound mysterious and strange.

And mysterious and strange remained even after reading the book, since the author doesn't do a great job at putting the "popular" in "popular science" as the things he's talking about grow more and more complex and seem to focus more on physics than math or geometry as I expected initially. It's hard to blame him though- perhaps there truly isn't an easy way to explain string theory for the uninitiated.

A thing that ended up annoying me to no end, however, was the writer's habit of using the names of his sons Alexei and Nicolai in pretty much every example and anecdote and description of an experiment. The first time he does it, it's sweet, but it gets really old really fast. Oh, it's just like that time when Nicolai was in a small car and he bumped into Alexei and said Alexei got in the way and basically they are both right.

A dispute between Einstein and another scientist? Oh, it's like that time when Alexei wanted to have blue hair, because disputes between scientists are essentially calls for attention.

It just goes on and on with tons of silly details about Alexei and Nicolai, two boys about which, frankly, my dear, I don't give a damn.