musicmarkup.info Design BOTANICAL LATIN PDF

BOTANICAL LATIN PDF

Tuesday, June 4, 2019 admin Comments(0)

This primer is based on short courses in botanical Latin run in Australia at the William Stearn's wonderful Botanical Latin appeared in and has gone. Stearn, William T.: Botanical Latin. History, Grammar, Syntax, Terminology and Vocabulary. Hafner Publishing Company. New York XIV + S., 41 Abb. STEARN, William - Botanical Latin. Michael Iesu. Loading Preview. Sorry, preview is currently unavailable. You can download the paper by clicking the button.


Author:DARIUS CLAYBROOKS
Language:English, Spanish, Dutch
Country:Bhutan
Genre:Health & Fitness
Pages:427
Published (Last):19.01.2016
ISBN:674-8-62187-724-4
ePub File Size:28.32 MB
PDF File Size:10.24 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Sign up for free]
Downloads:26165
Uploaded by: HAYDEN

Items 1 - 9 I BOTANICAL LATIN History, Grammar Syntax, Terminology and Cataloguing in Publication Data Stearn, William T. Botanical Latin—3rd rev. ed. 1. BOTANICAL LATIN BY WILLIAM T. STEARN PDF. This publication Botanical Latin By William T. Stearn is anticipated to be one of the very best seller publication. The Grammatical Dictionary of Botanical Latin is intended to help taxonomists prepare Latin diagnoses and descriptions of new taxa, and to read certain published Latin scientific literature, primarily in botany. It is a compendium from many sources of botanically useful words.

Stearn [5] [It is the Latin chosen by Linnaeus for the purpose of descriptions, and, I dare to say, for the use of those who love neither grammatical complications nor phrases arranged with senses on top of one another. Stearn wrote: [6] Botanical Latin is best described as a modern Romance language of special technical application, derived from Renaissance Latin with much plundering of ancient Greek, which has evolved, mainly since and primarily through the work of Carl Linnaeus —78 , to serve as an international medium for the scientific naming of plants in all their vast numbers and manifold diversity. These include many thousands of plants unknown to the Greeks and Romans of classical times and for which names have had to be provided as a means of reference. Their description necessitates the recording of structures often too small for comprehension by the naked eye, hence unknown to the ancients and needing words with precise restricted applications foreign to classical Latin. Orthography of taxon names[ edit ] Latin names of organisms are generally used in English without alteration, but some informal derivatives are used as common names. For example, the -idae ending of subclass names is changed to -ids e. The -ids common names have, however also been adopted as rankless clade names, sometimes containing further -ids clade names, so that, for example, in the APG IV classification, rosids contain both fabids and malvids.

I was amused by the small chapter on verbs—the authors very reluctantly cite the various terms used in the grammar of verbs such as Voice, Mood, Tense, and so on—and then restrict themselves to a revision of participles, generally limiting further discussion only to verbs in third person singular, although gerunds and gerundives are mentioned.

I should note at this point that italics are rigorously employed in the Primer to distinguish Latin from English. The chapter on prefixes and suffixes is also brief, but the authors note that their vocabulary in part four includes extensive lists of these. I would have preferred a slightly more detailed discussion in this chapter, given the importance of both prefixes and suffixes in forming epithets.

Part Two of the Primer covers Exercises, with eight pages devoted to the questions, and remaining eleven pages providing answers.

Latin pdf botanical

This is where the Primer really comes into its own—there is no substitute for doing, and from personal experience I know the benefits of attempting translation as early as possible. The examples here provide a good range of exercises in each grammatical group; even the verbs are covered, albeit briefly.

The third part of the Primer—Translating—is where the real process of understanding Botanical Latin descriptions and diagnoses begins. Here, a tabular format is introduced in the first of two chapters, Translating into Latin, which makes the process quite easy to understand, without being too verbose.

The Latin diagnosis is covered in the second section of this chapter, with some commonly used forms explained. In this regard, the authors have taken a similar approach to that in Baranov's Basic Latin for Plant Taxonomists Baranov begins with extensive formulaic or structural analysis of diagnoses and descriptions, and the Latin grammar forms the second part of his book.

The second chapter of this part in the Primer, translating from Latin into English, provides a comprehensive list of key steps, and then dives into parsing, with comments on word order, punctuation, and even a paragraph on handling errors in the Latin source text. Although only one sample text is provided from Lehmann : there is ample diversity in this sample to allow for eight pages of commentary on the English translation. Finally, part four is the Vocabulary, which takes up pages.

It is arranged so as to save space, by not including definitions and by keeping each entry to a minimum. Words similar in English and Latin are listed only once, under either one or the other word. As with Stearn's Vocabulary, closely related terms are grouped together in the one entry. A list of abbreviations is given in the introduction to the vocabulary; this takes the form of a paragraph with little to separate abbreviations.

I would have preferred to see a table or list with each abbreviation on a separate line. Clearly the abbreviations are important, and readers unfamiliar with Latin dictionaries and vocabularies will need to refer to this for some time.

B, with noun as stem indicates place of origin. B acaulis adj. As you might expect from the authors' locations, many of the suggested references are to Australian publications, including various floras and a style guide; but in general the list appears to cater adequately for the various fungal, algal, and plant groups globally.

Most of the books are fairly recent, but a few are timeless e. Lewis and Short ; still in print. My rough calculation of the number of entries i. I don't suggest for one minute that there is anything to gain from this direct comparison—just that the orders of magnitude are similar, and so one could confidently expect comparable results when searching the respective vocabularies for any given word.

Pdf botanical latin

My own experience in constructing lists of Latin words for translation and indexing is that about nouns, adjectives, and 1, adverbs, together with a range of prefixes and suffixes, are sufficient for the majority of higher plant descriptions and diagnoses, and are close to adequate when fungi and algae are included.

Now, this count of mine of c. This book is also available in e-book format on various operating systems and platforms, which I would expect to provide a full text search. Ultimately, this book will undoubtedly serve both as a primer, to assist in learning Botanical Latin, and as a point of reference when stuck for meaning or usage of a needed word or phrase.

This Primer is one of only a very select handful of such books produced in the past 40 years or so. Baranov , Rizzini ; in Portuguese , and at least one volume by Manara ; in Latin-American Spanish could be thought of as antecedents to this volume.

Botanical Latin: History, Grammar, Syntax, Terminology, and Vocabulary

But Stearn's Botanical Latin now in its fourth edition, having first appeared in ; last reprinted in is the model on which this Primer is based, and there are copious references to Stearn's book on almost every page. The book consists of four parts—Grammar, Exercises in Translation, Translating, and finally Vocabulary—as well as References and a brief, mainly categorical, Index.

Part I, Grammar, includes the usual tables of declensions, but there is nothing ponderous about this—the authors, no doubt as a result of their experiences teaching Botanical Latin, have managed to keep a light touch. There are 10 chapters here, with eight corresponding to those in Stearn's Part Two: Grammar in the Primer these are named The noun, The adjective and the participle, The adverb, The preposition, The conjunction, The pronoun, The verb, and finally Numerals, measurements.

Prefixes and suffixes from Stearn's Part Three: Syntax and other matters , and finally Miscellany, complete this part. In the eight Grammar chapters, each instance of a fully declined Latin word is illustrated by well-chosen examples, and there are, where necessary, references to the grammatical exceptions that occur in Botanical Latin.

In the nouns, generic names are introduced, and their construction and in some cases, a discussion of their gender, are covered. In the chapter on adjectives and participles, irregular forms are discussed, including the oft-abused parvus small , comparative minor not parvior , superlative minimus not parvissimus. Here, too, quam than is introduced due to its use in comparative phrases.

The chapters on adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions are short—two pages at most, but the complexities of pronouns and their ilk are thankfully given a greater emphasis, with seven pages of tables i. I was amused by the small chapter on verbs—the authors very reluctantly cite the various terms used in the grammar of verbs such as Voice, Mood, Tense, and so on—and then restrict themselves to a revision of participles, generally limiting further discussion only to verbs in third person singular, although gerunds and gerundives are mentioned.

I should note at this point that italics are rigorously employed in the Primer to distinguish Latin from English. The chapter on prefixes and suffixes is also brief, but the authors note that their vocabulary in part four includes extensive lists of these. I would have preferred a slightly more detailed discussion in this chapter, given the importance of both prefixes and suffixes in forming epithets.

Botanical Latin - Stearn.pdf

Part Two of the Primer covers Exercises, with eight pages devoted to the questions, and remaining eleven pages providing answers. This is where the Primer really comes into its own—there is no substitute for doing, and from personal experience I know the benefits of attempting translation as early as possible.

The examples here provide a good range of exercises in each grammatical group; even the verbs are covered, albeit briefly.

Pdf botanical latin

The third part of the Primer—Translating—is where the real process of understanding Botanical Latin descriptions and diagnoses begins. Here, a tabular format is introduced in the first of two chapters, Translating into Latin, which makes the process quite easy to understand, without being too verbose.

Latin pdf botanical

The Latin diagnosis is covered in the second section of this chapter, with some commonly used forms explained. In this regard, the authors have taken a similar approach to that in Baranov's Basic Latin for Plant Taxonomists Baranov begins with extensive formulaic or structural analysis of diagnoses and descriptions, and the Latin grammar forms the second part of his book.

The second chapter of this part in the Primer, translating from Latin into English, provides a comprehensive list of key steps, and then dives into parsing, with comments on word order, punctuation, and even a paragraph on handling errors in the Latin source text. Although only one sample text is provided from Lehmann : there is ample diversity in this sample to allow for eight pages of commentary on the English translation.

Primer of Botanical Latin with Vocabulary | Systematic Biology | Oxford Academic

Finally, part four is the Vocabulary, which takes up pages. It is arranged so as to save space, by not including definitions and by keeping each entry to a minimum.

Words similar in English and Latin are listed only once, under either one or the other word. As with Stearn's Vocabulary, closely related terms are grouped together in the one entry.